Posted by: isaraffee | August 10, 2009

Mounting Storage Devices in Sabayon Linux

Mounting Storage Devices (USB Thumbdrive and HD)

Sabayon uses device files e.g. /dev/sd* to mount USB storage devices. Before mounting your USB thumbdrive, check the existence of such files by typing:

sabayonx86 ~ # ll -rt /dev/sd*

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 0 1980-01-04 07:36 /dev/sda

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 2 1980-01-04 07:36 /dev/sda2

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 1 1980-01-04 07:37 /dev/sda

Such device files shown above refers to your hard disk. This is provened when you typed :

sabayonx86 ~ # fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 30.0 GB, 30005821440 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3648 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sda1 * 1 13 104391 83 Linux

/dev/sda2 14 3648 29198137+ 8e Linux LVM

The device files /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda2 are associated with the hard disk. When you insert your USB thumb drive, Saboyon will recognized it as in this case as /dev/sdb.

To use the storage device like your thumbdrive or external hard disk, you will need to mount them first by using the command format as show below:

mount -t <filetype> <device file> <mount point>

To know the device file, I suggest that before you plug in your USB thumbdrive or hard disk, type :

sabayonx86 ~ # ll /dev/sd*

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 0 1980-01-04 08:30 /dev/sda

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 1 1980-01-04 08:31 /dev/sda1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 2 1980-01-04 08:30 /dev/sda2

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 16 1980-01-04 01:59 /dev/sdb

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 17 1980-01-04 01:59 /dev/sdb1

When you plugged in the storage device, you then run the same command, and in my case it shows the following:

sabayonx86 ~ # ll /dev/sd*

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 0 1980-01-04 08:30 /dev/sda

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 1 1980-01-04 08:31 /dev/sda1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 2 1980-01-04 08:30 /dev/sda2

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 16 1980-01-04 01:59 /dev/sdb

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 17 1980-01-04 01:59 /dev/sdb1

brw-rw—- 1 root disk 8, 21 1980-01-04 01:59 /dev/sdb5

From the above output, Linux recognises that the device filename /dev/sdb5 is assigned to the storage device.

So back to our mount command you will type:

sabayonx86 ~ # mount /dev/sdb5 /media/myfriendHD/

In this case, I have omit the file type and left it to Linux to auto recognize it.

When you type mount, you will see that the storage device has been mounted successfully.

sabayonx86 ~ # mount

/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 on / type ext3 (rw,user_xattr)

proc on /proc type proc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec)

sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec)

udev on /dev type tmpfs (rw,nosuid)

devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,nosuid,noexec)

/dev/sda1 on /boot type ext3 (rw,user_xattr)

tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)

usbfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,devmode=0664,devgid=85)

binfmt_misc on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)

/dev/sdb5 on /media/myfriendHD type ntfs (rw)

The filesystem for this hard disk is ntfs. Just make sure that the mount directory, in this case /media/myfriendHD existed (You can make a directory and call whatever you want.)

Note

If I plugged in the storage device and accept the configuration by Linux, the file type is fuse instead of ntfs as shown below.

sabayonx86 ~ # mount

/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 on / type ext3 (rw,user_xattr)

proc on /proc type proc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec)

sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec)

udev on /dev type tmpfs (rw,nosuid)

devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,nosuid,noexec)

/dev/sda1 on /boot type ext3 (rw,user_xattr)

tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)

usbfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,devmode=0664,devgid=85)

binfmt_misc on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type binfmt_misc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)

/dev/sdb5 on /media/ah liang type fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,sync,default_permissions,allow_other

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: